Dangers of flu during pregnancy – expectant mothers encouraged to BEAT FLU now

Dangers of flu during pregnancy – expectant mothers encouraged to BEAT FLU now  

The Royal College of Midwives is again backing pleas for pregnant women to protect themselves and their unborn babies this winter.

Health officials have this week stressed the real dangers of influenza (flu) to pregnant women, and are reminding expectant mothers to get protection for themselves and their unborn baby against flu.

Pregnant women are vulnerable to infections, and can’t fight off the flu virus as well as other people. A pregnant woman who catches flu is more likely to deliver early, or for the baby to be stillborn or very ill in the first week following the birth.

A pregnant woman who catches flu is seven times more likely to die than a non-pregnant woman with flu.

Flu vaccine protects the mum-to-be and her baby, before it is born and also in their first few months of life.

Flu vaccines can be safely given during pregnancy, so health officials in Wales are encouraging pregnant women to have their free flu vaccine and help protect themselves and their unborn baby.

Commenting Helen Rogers, the Royal College of Midwives (RCM) Director for Wales said; “We strongly recommend that pregnant women have the flu vaccination during the flu season (autumn and winter) to protect themselves and their baby from the effects of flu. Women can have the flu vaccine at any stage during their pregnancy and it is important to do this as soon as possible.”

“We also urge midwives and other health professionals to have the vaccination to protect themselves, their family and the people they care for from infection as well.

“No expectant mother should take the unnecessary risk of not having the flu vaccine. I would urge any pregnant woman who is unsure to speak their midwife or GP.”

Flu vaccination will save mothers’ and babies’ lives. Lots of information and data on flu vaccines used in pregnancy has been collected from across the world and there is no indication that these vaccinations have any adverse effect on mother or baby.

Dr Richard Roberts, Head of the Vaccine Preventable Disease Programme at Public Health Wales, explains why, and how, pregnant women should protect themselves from flu: “Expectant mothers do not have the same ability as other healthy people to fight viruses such as flu, which is an illness that can be devastating for the woman and her unborn baby.

“If a pregnant woman catches the flu it can cause severe complications to mother and baby: but this can all be prevented with one quick, simple, vaccination”.

Second time mum, second time protected by the flu jab

After having her first baby – and first flu jab – back in 2014, local mum Joanne Black knows all about the importance of protecting yourself when case-study-jon-black-pregnancy-use-lryou’re pregnant.

Be it whooping cough or flu, both pose serious risk for mums to be and their unborn children – but you can help protect yourself against both these diseases with free vaccinations.

Jo is 29 weeks pregnant and has just been for her flu jab. She advises other pregnant women not to waste any time in getting vaccinated.

“I had the flu jab for the first time when I was pregnant with my daughter, Erin, two years ago. My midwife advised me to have the vaccine. It is a safe, quick and easy way to make sure you are protecting your baby, before it even enters this world.

“I didn’t think twice about whether or not to get vaccinated this time round – I made my appointment straight away. My view is if you wouldn’t drink alcohol or smoke when pregnant, why would you run the risk of catching flu when that can be very serious for mum and her baby, sadly some pregnant women die from flu.”

Pregnant women are vulnerable to infections, and can’t fight off the flu virus as well as other people.

Flu vaccine protects the mum-to-be and also her baby, before it is born and also in their first few months of life.

A pregnant woman who contracts flu is more likely to deliver prematurely, or for the baby to be stillborn or very ill in the first week following the birth.

A pregnant woman who catches flu is seven times more likely to die than a non-pregnant woman with flu.

“I would tell all mums-to-be not to take any chances with flu this year, vaccination is the best way to prevent you and your baby from catching flu”

For more information about pregnancy and the flu vaccination, please visit www.beatflu.org or speak to your midwife.

Readers can find out more about how to get their free vaccine by visiting www.beatflu.org or www.curwchffliw.org, or finding Beat Flu or Curwch Ffliw on twitter and facebook.

See also earlyyears.wales/beatflu-parents-urged-get-2-7-year-olds-vaccinated/

 

 

2018-01-24T10:09:52+00:00November 14th, 2016|